Glock Ugliness – Are They Anti?

I’d be shocked if any of my readers didn’t know that I make holsters at this point. One of the many questions that I get asked on a regular basis is how I mold the leather to each individual gun. Most people don’t really care what the mechanics of the process are so much as wondering how I have an example of so many different types of guns. When I first started this as a hobby on the side, I usually either borrowed a gun for the process or used my own gun if it happened to match. That is no longer feasible and I now use dummy guns. I have a lot of dummy guns. Just to give an example, I have something like four different 1911 variants, i.e. Colt safeties, extended safeties, railed frame, and a Coonan. I actually have three different Glocks, and I have more pocket pistols than anything else.

The guns that I use for patterning and forming are either cast solid aluminum, or Blueguns, manufactured by Rings. This is pretty standard for holster makers. Some of us prefer the aluminum guns for their durability and dimensional accuracy, and others prefer the Blueguns for their crisp detail. I generally prefer aluminum, but don’t have any problem with their plastic brethren if that’s what’s available at the time. In searching for additional dummy guns that I need to fulfill orders last week, I wandered onto the Blueguns website and saw this note on the front page:

blueglock

Which reads*:

NOTICE
GLOCKS ARE BACK!
Glock has recently issued a New Contract with Ring’s Manufacturing Inc. (BLUEGUNS) to manufacture Glock Blueguns as we have been doing for the past 10 years. This new contract states that Glock restricts the sale of Glock Blueguns to the Public. We are restricted to selling Glock Blueguns to the Police, Military, Trainers, Police Distributors, or Holster Manufacturers. We ask that our customers abide by these rules and refrain from offering Glock Blueguns to the Public on the Internet, Publications or General Catalogs. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your support.

Wait a minute. So basically, Glock made Rings agree to only sell their training replicas to “only ones”? In this case, that includes me, but I don’t need any more Glocks right now, and I don’t like classist attitude from any entity, especially a gun manufacturer. It’s no secret that they have classified their G25 and G28 as “Law enforcement only”, which is irksome but very few if any have complained about the absence of .380-caliber Glocks available to the public. I know that wouldn’t be my first choice in a chambering. Anyway, if Glock is taking an anti-rights stand, people need to know about it. So, I hopped on their website and sent them the following message:

Good morning,

I am a custom leather holster maker. Recently on a visit to blueguns.com, to research dummy guns for my production, I saw a note on the front page that reads:

“Glock has recently issued a New Contract with Ring’s Manufacturing Inc. (BLUEGUNS) to manufacture Glock Blueguns as we have been doing for the past 10 years. This new contract states that Glock restricts the sale of Glock Blueguns to the Public. We are restricted to selling Glock Blueguns to the Police, Military, Trainers, Police Distributors, or Holster Manufacturers. We ask that our customers abide by these rules and refrain from offering Glock Blueguns to the Public on the Internet, Publications or General Catalogs. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your support.”

Currently, I have several Glock Blueguns that I employ in the design and production of custom leather holsters, and I anticipate that I will eventually need more. Many of my customers and colleagues desire to have a Bluegun training replica as a copy of their daily carry gun for draw practice, retention training, and other forms of training and practice, as a measure of safety above using a genuine handgun for such practices. These people are not necessarily law enforcement, trainers, or holster makers. Is it true that Glock has contractually forbidden Ring’s from selling training replicas to ordinary citizens? If so, why? Thanks in advance,

–Michael

Maybe they’ve got a really good explanation or maybe it’s just a big misunderstanding. Whether that’s the case, or if their response is, “because you suck and we hate you,” I’ll be sure to let you know either way. We live in interesting times, my friends. I think that a Glock is a fine pistol, but I’m not lining the pockets of anyone who wants to deprive me of my rights – especially not in the current climate.

10 thoughts on “Glock Ugliness – Are They Anti?

  1. I’m eager to hear what their reason is. I’ve used Blueguns in classes, and think they’re a great tool for training people to be comfortable handling firearms safely. I guess they’ve allowed the people who most need them to still buy them, but why not anyone who wants one? My only thought is they’re afraid people will paint them black and use them in crimes. But anyone stupid enough to brandish a non-functioning pistol gets what happens to them.

    • Me too actually. I really hope they have a good reason that will be obvious once stated. I agree with your assessment of people brandishing fake guns. If a threat appears to be real by any reasonable estimation, the fact that it is a farce is not valid protection.

  2. The Gun Control Act of 68 has a points system controlling imported handguns in an attempt to ban “Saturday Night Specials”. A pistol needs 75 points. Points are tallied based on a relatively arbitrary set of features–caliber, type of sights, thumb rests in the grips, grooves in the trigger, frame material, size and weight among other things.

    Frame material is a big one–steel or “HTS Alloy” is worth 15 to 20 points, plastic is zero. Most Glocks don’t qualify for import as originally designed, so are modified for the US market. In some cases the modifications are reverted to original parts before sale. .380 or below is worth 7 points less than 9mm or above, and the Glock .380′s aren’t locked breech, costing another 5. Chances are that Glock would be willing to sell .380′s to the US, but the modifications that would make them legal to import aren’t worth the small market.

    • I was unaware of the points system on pistols. Thanks for the info! Is that among the same regs that makes AK builders count points? I’m not sure I could ever build an AK just because of that – seems like it would be hard to remember what is what.

  3. Pingback: Restrictions on fake guns too? « TacticalTupperware

  4. I have a copy of Guns and Ammo magazine from the ’68-’70 period which went into a lot of detail on GCA ’68, including pre/post photos of the mandated changes manufacturers were required to make. It also forced several great pocket pistols from Europe out of the US market due to size restrictions and impossible revisions to manufacturing design. One memorable example was how they ruined the lines of the FN pocket pistols by mandating the adjustable sights, wider grip panels, and width of the slide. I think my Mauser HsC made it under the wire by importation as components and assembly in the US by Stoeger.

  5. This sounds like a sales opportunity for 3D printing – you could have a library of gun patterns on a cd-rom, and print off whatever you need, without needing to wait for shipping. There are also “scanners” that use the same equipment to measure an example gun, and create a computer model that can be printed out.

    The cheaper printers are down to hundreds of dollars, and it wouldn’t take more than overnight to print one out, I bet. Probably would be pretty close to the actual size, too.

  6. I think the AK regs came considerably later, but I could be wrong. Import Points was meant to restrict Saturday Night Specials, and was supported by much of the US gun industry. It is also directly responsible for Jennings/Bryco/Jiminez/Phoenix/Raven etc that took over for the imported guns.

    • Also why Kel-Tec, Taurus Diamond back, etc are all making their 380s in Florida.

      Taurus built a plant there just for the 380 plastic pistols to get around the import restrictions.

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